Process of ovulation


Ovulation is a process that completes once a month in a woman’s body and occurs when an ovary releases an egg. The ovulation cycle lasts for about 28 days, but the exact time of ovulation can vary greatly from one woman to another. Periods usually begin 2 weeks after the onset of ovulation, with 14 days between the start of one period and the next.

The process of ovulation starts with the release of a hormone called luteinizing hormone (LH) from the pituitary gland in the brain. This LH hormone triggers the release of an egg from one of your ovaries. The egg then travels down the fallopian tube towards the uterus. If the egg is fertilized by a sperm cell, it will attach to the wall of the uterus and begin to grow into a baby.

If the egg is not fertilized, it will break apart and be absorbed by your body. The corpus luteum (a hormone-producing structure that forms from the empty follicle following ovulation), which can be found in the ovary will dissolve and the levels of estrogen and progesterone hormones decrease. This triggers menstruation (the end of your menstrual cycle) within 14 days after the egg is released.

What happens during ovulation?

A tree next to a body of water

Ovulation usually occurs approximately 14 days before your period starts. During ovulation, an increase in hormones causes a mature egg to burst through the wall of one of your ovaries and be released into the fallopian tube in a process called “ovulation.”

An increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) triggers the release. This LH surge starts when an area in your brain called the pituitary gland sends a message to your ovary that it is time for an egg to prepare for release.

About twenty-four hours after the LH surge starts, you should see a positive result on an ovulation predictor kit (OPK) or notice cervical mucus that is slippery, clear, and stretchy. This signals that ovulation is about to take place.

After the Egg Is Released: After the LH surge starts, an egg will start its journey down a fallopian tube toward your uterus. If the egg meets a sperm cell in one of the fallopian tubes along the way, fertilization may occur. The fertilized egg then reaches your uterus and implants in the lining.

If the egg is not fertilized, it will break apart and be absorbed by your body within a few days. The corpus luteum (a hormone-producing structure that forms from the empty follicle following ovulation), which can be found in the ovary will dissolve and the levels of estrogen and progesterone hormones decrease. This triggers menstruation (the end of your menstrual cycle) within 14 days after the egg is released.

How long does ovulation last?

A close up of a light

Ovulation typically lasts for about 24 hours. However, the process can vary greatly from woman to woman. Some women may only ovulate for a few hours, while others may ovulate for up to 48 hours.

What are the signs of ovulation?

Some women experience the signs and symptoms of ovulation more than others. Periods usually begin 2 weeks after the onset of ovulation, with 14 days between the start of one period and the next. This is different for every woman and may even change from month to month.

During ovulation, you may experience: Change in vaginal discharge, Acne, Breast tenderness, Bloating.

Subscribe to our monthly Newsletter
Subscribe to our monthly Newsletter